[1.2] Time Is Money: How to Make Lost Revenue in Your Salon a Thing of the Past

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    You know what sucks? Booking a four hour block of time for a color correction client, only to have that client “forget” the appointment or cancel at the last minute. How often does this happen to you? Have you ever calculated how much these losses are costing you?

    I have performed these calculations for many salon owners and can say with complete confidence that no appointment-based salon can afford to operate without cancellation policies. You’ll hear it said that no-shows are the single highest cause of lost revenue in the salon, and—while I doubt anyone has performed a nationwide investigation to inform that conclusion—in my experience, there is certainly a lot of truth to it.

    No-shows, last-minute service downgrades, and late-cancellations are damned expensive.

    Have you ever thought about where cancellations and no-shows come from? What makes clients believe it’s okay to reserve a professional’s time and then treat it as if it’s worthless?

    You’re probably not going to like what I have to say, but we only have ourselves to blame. In this episode (and this post, if you’re into reading), I’ll tell you exactly why that’s true and how to stop it once and for all.

    In this podcast, I also introduce the new downloadable–The Policy Creation & Enforcement Pack. You can check that out here.

    This Ugly Beauty Business
    [1.2] Time Is Money: How to Make Lost Revenue in Your Salon a Thing of the Past
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    Beauty industry survivalist, salon crisis interventionist, tactical verb-weapon specialist, and the leader of at least a hundred workplace revolutions, Tina Alberino is known as much for her extensive knowledge as for her sarcastic wit and mercilessly straightforward style. She’s the author of the book The Beauty Industry Survival Guide and the blog This Ugly Beauty Business. When she’s not writing, educating, or consulting, she can be found overthinking everything, identifying problems people didn’t know existed, and stubbornly working to change the things she cannot accept.

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